Bookings open for the first Cambridge Festival

Need help with homeschooling? Why not get the kids involved with one of our hands-on events happening across the festival – there’s plenty to choose from, from the science behind ice-cream to the truth about worms!

© Cambridge University Botanic Garden

© Cambridge University Botanic Garden

If you’re local to Cambridge – and it is safe to do so, why not head down to the Cambridge Botanic Gardens this Easter and have a game of outdoor bingo! To join in the fun simply pick up your free bingo sheet on your way into the Garden, get hunting for different springtime sights and claim your prize at the end. The bingo includes lots of amazing springtime plants and animals including the brightly coloured Brimstone butterfly, beautiful cherry blossoms and the elusive Purple Toothwort plant.

Cherry blossom and Purple Toothwort plant at Cambridge Botanic Garden. © Howard Rice/Cambridge University Botanic Garden

Cherry blossom and Purple Toothwort plant at Cambridge Botanic Garden. © Howard Rice/Cambridge University Botanic Garden

The week before the festival begins, you will be able to pick up a copy of the Festival Zine through food hubs around Cambridge. Full of ‘try this at home’ activities, including hands-on investigations/experiments and knowledge-boosting quizzes, you can even try your hand at creating your own windowsill garden to making your own Giant Sea-Scorpion. For those of you not able to pick up a copy, it is available to download online for free.

Silhouette of man looking at sky. © Greg Rakozy via UnSplash

Silhouette of man looking at sky. © Greg Rakozy via UnSplash

Young people from across Cambridge have been submitting their questions to our scientists and now they’re ready to answer them; everything from volcanoes, aliens, space and the big bang! Join the Cambridge University Press Book Shop and their experts and get ready to be amazed.

What are cells and how are they made? Using objects in the Whipple Museum collections to find out how our cells work, you will then be invited to create or draw your own cell model to remind yourself of how everything works. 

Is electricity your thing? Why not join the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy in an interactive workshop where you will learn about where the energy which powers our lights comes from, and why some light bulbs waste lots of energy. Their experts will also talk you through making a special spinning toy, which will let you explore how energy is wasted in your home, with help from your responsible grown-up!

Related:  Unexpected experiences: Stephen J Toope concludes the series with a sense of optimism for the future

More from: | Category: University News