Free, fun and fascinating ARU events at festival

Published: 26 February 2021 at 14:00

Cambridge Festival logo, pink background, white circle with the words Cambridge Festival written inside and an illustration of speech bubble divided into many shapes. Text and speech bubble is pink.

Anglia Ruskin to put on a variety of online events for new Cambridge Festival

A series of free, online events will explore a variety of subjects including the science of attraction, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and unusual cases of murder and witchcraft in the UK.

Anglia Ruskin University (ARU) is putting on seven events in March as part of the new interdisciplinary Cambridge Festival, which amalgamates the Cambridge Science Festival and the Cambridge Festival of Ideas.

Among the 350 mainly digital events taking place during March are the following talks and performances hosted by ARU:

Mesopotanium mud: A journey through voice and vessel. An audio-facilitated virtual walk encompassing art, nature, geoarchaeology and earth sciences. Runs on demand from 26 March until 4 April from 10am-8pm, booking not necessary. 
Bringing the curtain down: Mikhail Gorbachev and the collapse of the Soviet Union. To mark its 30th anniversary, Dr Jonathan Davis examines the causes of the quiet end of communism in the USSR. On demand  from 26 March-4 April, 10am-8pm, no booking necessary.
Attraction explained: The science of how we form relationships. Professor Viren Swami looks at which factors affect who we fall for, and why. 26 March, 7pm-8.30pm, booking required.
Murder and witches: crime writers Cathi Unsworth, Syd Moore and Mick Finlay talk about unusual cases of murder and witchcraft in English history that inspired their writing. 27 March,  3pm-4.15pm, booking required.
Introducing artscaping: creative adventuring for children’s wellbeing. Exploring the principles and practice of improving wellbeing in schools through creative practice in nature. 30 March, 4pm-5pm, booking required.
Common Knowledge: What it is and why we can’t live without it. Dr Mike Wilby explains what common knowledge is, why it is needed and why our current political climate puts it at risk. 30 March, 7pm-8pm, booking required.
Opera Aperta. A collaborative performing group presents extracts and invites discussion of these new works exploring text, image, voice and sound. 31 March, 7.30pm-8.30pm, booking required.

Related:  Indigenous knowledge still undervalued - study

Miriam Berg, Public Engagement Officer for ARU, said:

“We are proud to be a part of the inaugural Cambridge Festival. Our academic staff are running a number of exciting online events and there is sure to be something for everyone. The Cambridge Festival promises to be a great opportunity to broaden your mind!”

Booking is now open for these events. For more information and to secure your place, visit aru.ac.uk/communityevents


More from: | Category: University News