Touchdown! Life-searching Perseverance rover to land today on Mars | Imperial News | Imperial College London

Was there ever life on Mars? Now that Perseverance is landing, Imperial scientists working with NASA’s Mars 2020 mission might soon find out.

After a seven-month journey, NASA’s Perseverance rover, a scientific laboratory the size of a car, will make its final descent to the Red Planet to begin a search for traces of life.   

Lakes are fantastic at fostering and preserving life, so if there is any to be found then it could well be in the Jezero crater. Professor Sanjeev Gupta Department of Earth Science and Engineering

Perseverance will land in Mars’s 28-mile wide Jezero crater, which contains sediments of an ancient river delta and where evidence of past life could be preserved if it ever existed on Mars. The rover will use its drill to collect samples from Martian rocks before storing the sample cores in tubes on the Martian surface ready to return them to Earth in 2030. 

The rover will descend at nearly 1,000 miles per hour through the Martian atmosphere before retro rockets kick in to reduce its speed. At around 20 metres from the surface the rover itself will be lowered by a sky crane to its target destination.

This illustration shows the events that occur in the final minutes of the nearly seven-month journey that NASA’s Perseverance rover takes to Mars. Entry, Descent, and Landing, or "EDL,” begins when the spacecraft reaches the top of the Martian atmosphere, travelling nearly 12,500 mph (20,000 kph). It ends about seven minutes later, with Perseverance stationary on the Martian surface. Perseverance handles everything on its own during this process. It takes more than 11 minutes to get a radio signal back from Mars, so by the time the mission team hears that the spacecraft has entered the atmosphere, in reality, the rover is already on the ground.
Hundreds of critical events must execute perfectly and exactly on time for the rover to land on Mars safely (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Supported by funds from the UK Space Agency, researchers at Imperial and its neighbour, the Natural History Museum, will help decide which samples are sent to Earth in a search for evidence of ancient microbial life. 

This could be the mission that answers the question of whether life ever existed on Mars…the molecular fingerprints of Martian life need not only to have been generated, but also preserved over billions of years. Professor Mark Sephton Head, Department of Earth Science and Engineering

Imperial researchers are playing a major role in the mission. Back on Earth, Imperial’s Professor Sanjeev Gupta, a geologist, will help NASA oversee mission operations from a science and engineering point of view, helping decide where the rover will go and what it will sample. Imperial’s Professor Mark Sephton, an astrobiologist,will help to identify samples of Mars that could contain evidence of past life.

Related:  Genome of Alexander Fleming’s original penicillin-producing mould sequenced | Imperial News | Imperial College London

Meanwhile, researchers from the Natural History Museum will be studying the mineralogy, chemistry, and environments recorded in sedimentary rocks exposed in the Jezero crater and looking the potential for signatures of ancient microbial life preserved within. 

Professor Gupta, of Imperial’s Department of Earth Science and Engineering, will be working closely with the science team to develop the mission’s strategic science vision, making sure that it fulfils its science objectives. Day-to-day he will work with the engineers in rover operations to search for samples of rocks for a future return to Earth.  

He said: “It is crucial to understand what the Martian climate was like early in Mars’ history and whether it was habitable for life. Analysis of data from instruments onboard Perseverance will help us define the best spots to collect rock samples for future return to Earth. Lakes are fantastic at fostering and preserving life, so if there is any to be found then it could well be in the Jezero crater.

“Laboratory analyses of such samples on Earth will enable us search for morphological and chemical signatures of ancient life on Mars and also answer key questions about Mars’ geological evolution.” 

The target landing area of NASA’s Perseverance rover is overlaid on this image of its landing site on Mars, Jezero Crater. The larger landing ellipses of several other Mars missions are shown for comparison.
The target landing area of NASA’s Perseverance rover is overlaid on this image of its landing site on Mars, Jezero Crater. The larger landing ellipses of several other Mars missions are shown for comparison. As landing technology improves and these landing ellipses shrink, missions can aim for more precise landings, opening up new areas of Mars to explore. (ESA/DLR/FU-Berlin/NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Professor Sephton, Head of the Department of Earth Science and Engineering, is an astrobiologist who specialises in recognising the organic records of past life in rocks and will help the team select samples for eventual return to Earth.

He said: “This could be the mission that answers the question of whether life ever existed on Mars. Evidence of biology on another planet would mean that life on Earth was not alone. However, the molecular fingerprints of Martian life need not only to have been generated, but also preserved over billions of years.

“We need to choose the best samples from a planet’s worth of opportunities and return around half a kilogram of material from Mars. Once safely back on Earth the samples of Mars will reveal their secrets when examined by the most powerful instruments available.”

Related:  Touchdown! Life-searching Perseverance rover lands on Mars | Imperial News | Imperial College London

Scientific goals

Perseverance will focus on finding the signs of life and reconstructing the geological history of Mars. Its onboard carbon-searching instruments will seek out the building blocks of life by analysing samples of rock from the surface. It will select samples before collecting them using the drill and then sealing them in sample tubes. 

The Mars Ingenuity Helicopter
The Mars Ingenuity Helicopter will make the first attempt at powered, controlled flight on another planet (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

When the rover reaches a suitable location, the rover will drop the tubes on the surface of Mars to be collected by a future retrieval mission, the Sample Fetch rover. Back on Earth, a team will curate and study the rocks for evidence of microbial life. 

The rover also carries the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter, which will make the first attempt at powered, controlled flight on another planet by flying short distances from the rover. A successful test of the helicopter could lead to more flying probes to survey the landscape of other planets.

Perseverance will also trial new technologies to help astronauts make future expeditions to Mars. These include testing a method for producing oxygen from the Martian atmosphere, identifying other resources like subsurface water, improving landing techniques, and characterising weather and other potential environmental conditions that could affect future astronauts living and working on Mars. 

This annotated mosaic depicts a possible route the Mars 2020 Perseverance rover could take across Jezero Crater as it investigates several ancient environments that may have once been habitable.
A possible route the Mars 2020 Perseverance rover could take across Jezero Crater as it investigates several ancient environments that may have once been habitable (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Imperial scientists Drs Steve Banham, Rob Barnes and Sam Royle from the Department of Earth Science and Engineering will be answering questions from the public in a Reddit ‘Ask Me Anything’ event on the forum r/Space live from 4-6PM on Thursday 18th February. 

Professors Gupta and Sephton also gave a lecture on the mission for Imperial’s Science Breaks programme and answered questions from interested audience members.

Watch the landing live on the JPL website.

This news story was adapted from a press release by the UK Space Agency.

Video: UK Space Agency with additional footage from NASA

See the press release of this article


More from: | Category: University News